26.02.2021

What you should tip in every situation, from your uber driver, to your barber

How many times have you found yourself in that awkward situation where a certain worker lingers just a little longer after you settle up with the bill? You start to think to yourself, ‘does this person expect a tip?’ or ‘am I an asshole for only dropping an extra 5 on this plumbing job?’ The guilt and anxiety can weigh on us all, even if we’re genuinely good people & decent tippers by nature.

With this moral conundrum in mind, the folks over at DealNews recently broke down the most common situations in which tipping is expected and how much to tip for each one. It’s like a ‘Tipping for Dummies’ handbook, and it can help you in almost any situation. So let’s get to it, starting with the most obvious tip of all, the restaurant experience, and then working from there…

Waitstaff

Standard tip: 15% (up to 20% for exceptional service)

Fast-casual restaurants

Standard tip: extra change (up to $2 for exceptional service)

Tip when paying. The jars are divvied up among staff, so you’re tipping the whole crew.

Babysitters

Standard tip: 10% (up to 15% for exceptional service, and one week’s pay for the holidays to be gifted beforehand)

Exceptional service would be things like cooking dinner, cleaning up after kids at an event, doing a big activity with the kids, dealing with an ill child, taking on any last-minute booking, and staying later than discussed.

Bellhops/porters

Standard tip: $1 to $2 per bag, $5 minimum

Tip after they deliver bags to the room and when they pick the bags up.

Massages

Standard tip: 10% to 15% (up to 20% for exceptional service)

Bus drivers (not mass transit)

Standard tip: $1 to $2

Only tip if they handle your luggage.

Caterers

Standard tip: 15% to 20% of total bill, or $50 per server

Tip when paying the final bill or when the event comes to a close.

Chauffeurs

Standard tip: 10% (up to 15% for exceptional service)

Haircuts/blowouts

Standard tip: 10% to 15% (up to 15% to 20% for exceptional service)

Tip after the service is completed, assuming they didn’t butcher your hair.

Appliance delivery

That’s installation, Holmes. Standard tip: $10 per person (up to $20 per person for exceptional service)

Housekeeping (hotels)

Standard tip: $2 per night (up to $5 per night)

Tip daily since different people usually clean the room every day.

Apartment/building supers

Standard tip: $5 per job (up to $10 for exceptional service and $75 to $150 if it’s around the holidays)

Only tip after the job is complete.

Plumbers

Standard tip: $10 for smaller jobs (up to 10% of total job for exceptional service)

Taxi drivers

Standard tip: 15% to 20% of your fare

Tip once you reach your destination.

Uber/Lyft

Standard tip: $1 to $2 per person for shorter rides; 10% (up to 20% for exceptional service)

Tip at the end of the ride, and tip extra for traffic, construction, distance, inconveniences, and if the driver helps with luggage or packages.

Parking valets

Standard tip: $2 (up to $5 for exceptional service)

Tip when your vehicle is retrieved, although it’s often suggested to tip when dropping your vehicle off as well.

Dry cleaning or laundry pickup

Standard tip: $3 to $5, depending on the size of the wash

Car-wash employees

Standard tip: $2 to $3 for a basic wipe down, $5 to $10 for more complicated washes, 15% for detailing

Tip when the job is complete (assuming they did a thorough job).

Cable/internet/satellite installers

Standard tip: $20

Tip when the job is complete. Unless they’re Comcast. OK, I kid, I kid, even Comcast.

Room service

Standard tip: $5 minimum

If gratuity is added to the check, there’s no need to tip.

Furniture delivery

Standard tip: $5 per person (up to $20 for exceptional service)

Tip when the job is finished, and consider offering cold drinks if it’s heavy furniture (especially on a hot summer day).

Bartenders

Standard tip: $1 per drink or 15% of the total bill

Pro tip is to tip before you receive your drink if you want speedier service.

AAA tow service

Standard tip: $5 to $10

If the tow bill is excessively high or you can’t afford it, a tip isn’t necessary.

Food delivery

Standard tip: $10% or $2 minimum

Tip online or when the food is delivered.

Bathroom attendants

Standard tip: $0.50 if they hand you a paper towel (up to $2 to $3 per service for extra services, such as mending hems or polishing shoes)

Tipping isn’t always allowed.

Makeup artists

Standard tip: 15% (up to 25% for exceptional service)

Tip at the end of the job.

Carryout/takeout restaurants

Standard tip: $0 (up to 10% for exceptional service)

Tip if your order is complicated, large, or delivered curbside.

Personal trainers

Standard tip: $20 (up to $50 for exceptional service) around the holidays, and be discreet.

Airport-shuttle drivers

Standard tip: 15% (up to 20% for exceptional service)

Tip similarly to how you would a cab driver.

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