02.03.2021

Fettuccine and Tagliatelle Are Not the Same Thing . . . Right?

Pasta-lovers, it’s time to test your knowledge. Fettuccine and tagliatelle are two forms of long, thick-cut pasta you’ve probably seen on restaurant menus and eaten plenty of times, but do you know the real difference? If your answer is “no,” you’re on to something . . . because there’s actually no difference at all. As I learned during my trip to Casa Buitoni in Tuscany (among other things, like how to make pasta from scratch), this popular cut of pasta is named two different things based on region.

It’s called fettuccine in Rome and Southern Italy, and it’s referred to as tagliatelle in the Northern regions of Italy. But it’s the exact same thing! As a self-proclaimed pasta addict who eats Italian food 99 percent of the time, I have to say this information even surprised me. Now I’ll never confuse the two on a menu again.

What Kind of Milk Is Really the Standard at Starbucks?

Unless you specify otherwise, your Starbucks latte will be made with 2 percent milk . . . but that wasn’t always the case. When Starbucks first opened in 1971, all lattes and milk-based drinks were made with whole milk because former CEO Howard Schultz wanted to use the milk that Italians drink with their coffee. “Originally, Schultz only allowed whole milk in stores,” because he strove to serve only “Italian-style espresso drinks,” NPR reported.

While whole milk was the standard for more than 30 years, customers began to voice their opinions and demand a change, so Starbucks “eliminated all artificial trans fat and made 2 percent milk the new standard for espresso beverages” in 2007. What’s interesting is that year was actually the first time that Starbucks started carrying 2 percent.

If you asked for it before then, what you really got was a blend of whole milk and skim milk made by the barista. According to the Seattle Times, “each reduced-fat latte at Starbucks was its own unique blend. Baristas poured a little from the whole-milk jug and a little from the skim-milk bottle until one-of-a-kind fat reduction was achieved.”

Now it seems crazy to think there used to be limited options for the type of milk you wanted to order in your latte. Today, Starbucks’s milks include whole, nonfat, 2 percent, soy, coconut, and almond milk. Did you know that little piece of Starbucks history?

Yes, You Can Make Whipped Cream Without an Electric Mixer

Few desserts can’t be improved with a dollop of billowy whipped cream – heck, for a simple no-cook dessert, serve a cloud of whipped cream with peak-season Summer berries. Our preferred method for beating air into cream involves a stand or hand mixer, as it lets the machine do the heavy lifting, but you can still make whipped cream even if an electrical aid isn’t on hand. Before you try one of these low-tech routes to whipped cream, keep these tips in mind.

How to Make Whipped Cream Without a Mixer
  • Chill everything: Cold cream transforms to fluffy peaks faster, so make sure to thoroughly chill the cream and any instruments involved, including the container it’ll be whipped in and the tool you’ll use to incorporate air.
  • Sweeten the cream at the end: Wait to add flavorings until the cream has been whipped to the desired thickness. Sweeten it to taste with sugar, honey, maple syrup, or your sweetener of choice (or leave it unsweetened). This is also the time to gently fold in other flavors like vanilla extract, cardamom, rose water, or orange blossom water.
  • With a whisk: Whisk cream in a large mixing bowl with the largest whisk you have – a balloon whisk is ideal as it will speed up the process, but any style will work.
  • With a fork: Don’t have a whisk? A fork can be substituted in a pinch! A fork incorporates less air than a whisk, so don’t panic if it takes a while for peaks to form.
  • With a mason jar: Fill a mason jar up to half full with cream, add a clean cork (from a bottle of white wine to avoid discoloration), then tightly twist on the lid and shake it aggressively until the cream reaches the desired thickness.
Spread the love

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *